Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Life-History Consequences of Growth Rate Depression: An Experimental Study on Carrion Crows (Corvus corone corone L.)

H. Richner, P. Schneiter and H. Stirnimann
Functional Ecology
Vol. 3, No. 5 (1989), pp. 617-624
DOI: 10.2307/2389577
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389577
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Life-History Consequences of Growth Rate Depression: An Experimental Study on Carrion Crows (Corvus corone corone L.)
Preview not available

Abstract

It has often been proposed that parents could vary the growth rates of nestling birds as an adaptive strategy to maximize reproductive output. Although it has been recognized that a depression of growth rate may result in prolonged nestling times and hence increase the probability of predation, it is often assumed that there is no phenotype-related cost of slow growth. In the present study, we assess the effect of reduced growth rates on body size and on social status of carrion crows (Corvus corone corone L.). Daily weight gain for a group of nestlings was experimentally limited and a control group of siblings and non-siblings was raised under conditions of unlimited food. The growth of body mass and of linear body dimension, fledgling mass and fledgling size were compared for the two groups. Growth forms of the two groups are compared with three proposed growth models. Finally, the relation of social status of these individuals as juveniles to their former feeding group was examined. Nestlings growing with limited food and thus with depressed growth rates reached a significantly lower final weight and reached it later than did birds fed ad libitum. Growth in linear body dimension followed a different pattern; nestlings with depressed growth rates reached a significantly lower tarsus length, but reached it nearly as fast as chicks with unlimited food. As juveniles, the birds of the former experimental group suffered lower social status than the control birds. Both sibling and non-sibling interactions resulted in significantly more wins for control birds. Our results show that the reduction of daily weight gain can affect the phenotype and fitness correlated parameters.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
617
    617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
618
    618
  • Thumbnail: Page 
619
    619
  • Thumbnail: Page 
620
    620
  • Thumbnail: Page 
621
    621
  • Thumbnail: Page 
622
    622
  • Thumbnail: Page 
623
    623
  • Thumbnail: Page 
624
    624