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The Clonal Ecology of Heterocypris incongruens (Ostracoda): Life-History Traits and Photoperiod

V. Rossi and P. Menozzi
Functional Ecology
Vol. 7, No. 2 (1993), pp. 177-182
DOI: 10.2307/2389884
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389884
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Clonal Ecology of Heterocypris incongruens (Ostracoda): Life-History Traits and Photoperiod
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Abstract

1. The coexistence of different clones and, in general, the clonal structure of parthenogenetic populations have been linked to differences in the ecological requirements. 2. Previous field and laboratory work demonstrated the effect of temperature on the seasonal succession of electrophoretic clones of Heterocypris incongruens in an Italian ricefield. 3. Here we report the results of laboratory experiments on the effect of photoperiod on life-history traits (age and carapace length at first reproduction, age at death, number of resting and total eggs) of these clones. 4. Clonal differentiation is greater at 16:8 L:D than at 12:12 L:D. 5. The winter clone responds to longer light hours by slowing down its growth and producing a larger number of resting eggs. In contrast, the summer clone, when exposed to long days (16:8 L:D), has faster growth and higher survival while producing almost no resting eggs. 6. No clear effect of photoperiod was found in a clone rare in the field in all seasons. 7. The pattern of response to longer daylight hours validates the hypothesis of an important role of photoperiod in determining the seasonal clonal succession observed in the field.

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