Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

A Statistical Analysis of Mammalian Rates of Metabolism

B. K. McNab
Functional Ecology
Vol. 6, No. 6 (1992), pp. 672-679
DOI: 10.2307/2389963
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389963
Page Count: 8
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Statistical Analysis of Mammalian Rates of Metabolism
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Much controversy has attended discussions of the factors responsible for variation in rate of metabolism in mammals. 2. Potential factors were examined here by analysis of covariance to determine whether they correlate with basal rate of metabolism in mammals. 3. Variation in body mass, taxonomic affiliation, food habits, climate, activity level, propensity to enter torpor and form of reproduction accounts for almost all variation in the basal rate of metabolism in mammals. 4. In all analyses body mass had the greatest impact on basal rate. Often it was the only factor to influence basal rate in small or ecologically constricted sets of species. 5. As the number of species and the ecological diversity of the assemblage increased, the number of factors significantly associated with basal rate increased. 6. In several sets of species the exclusion of taxonomic affiliation brought one or more ecological factors into significance. This pattern suggests that much of the correlation of basal rate with taxonomic affiliation indirectly reflects ecological correlates.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
672
    672
  • Thumbnail: Page 
673
    673
  • Thumbnail: Page 
674
    674
  • Thumbnail: Page 
675
    675
  • Thumbnail: Page 
676
    676
  • Thumbnail: Page 
677
    677
  • Thumbnail: Page 
678
    678
  • Thumbnail: Page 
679
    679
Part of Sustainability