Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Bats and Barometric Pressure: Conserving Limited Energy and Tracking Insects from the Roost

K. N. Paige
Functional Ecology
Vol. 9, No. 3 (Jun., 1995), pp. 463-467
DOI: 10.2307/2390010
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2390010
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Bats and Barometric Pressure: Conserving Limited Energy and Tracking Insects from the Roost
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Studies were conducted to assess the response of a seasonal cave-dwelling bat and its insect prey to natural and experimental changes in barometric pressure. 2. The Eastern Pipistrelle, Pipistrellus subflavus, tracks barometric pressure metabolically. 3. Eastern Pipistrelles potentially use pressure as a cue for predicting the relative abundance of aerial insect prey outside the roost. 4. Barometric pressure tracking affords these bats an opportunity to conserve limited energy and make appropriate foraging decisions. 5. Barometric pressure tracking is viewed as an alternative evolutionary strategy to torpor and may be a widespread phenomenon among insect-feeding bats that roost deep within caves.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
463
    463
  • Thumbnail: Page 
464
    464
  • Thumbnail: Page 
465
    465
  • Thumbnail: Page 
466
    466
  • Thumbnail: Page 
467
    467