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Trade-Offs with Resistance to a Granulosis Virus in the Indian Meal Moth, Examined by a Laboratory Evolution Experiment

M. Boots and M. Begon
Functional Ecology
Vol. 7, No. 5 (Oct., 1993), pp. 528-534
DOI: 10.2307/2390128
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2390128
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Trade-Offs with Resistance to a Granulosis Virus in the Indian Meal Moth, Examined by a Laboratory Evolution Experiment
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Abstract

1. When microbial agents are used as pest-control agents, resistance in the host may be selected for. If resistance occurs there are potentially fitness costs due to trade-offs between resistance and other life-history traits. Genotypic trade-offs with resistance to a virus in a lepidopteran host are examined by a micro-evolutionary selection experiment. 2. Six populations of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were established, three of which supported a granulosis virus infection (selected insects) while the remaining three acted as virus-free controls. 3. After a period of 2 years, bioassays with the virus showed that selected moths were 1.96-fold more resistant to infection (LD50s) than those derived from the virus-free control populations. 4. Correlated with this increase in resistance were a lengthening of development time, a reduction in egg viability and an increase in pupal weight. 5. These changes in life-history traits suggest that a cost in fitness of 15% (sensu Sibly & Calow 1986) is associated with the evolution of the resistance. 6. The importance of fitness costs associated with the development of resistance to pathogens is discussed.

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