Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Effect of Vertically Transmitted Ectoparasites on the Reproductive Success of Swifts (Apus apus)

D. M. Tompkins, T. Jones and D. H. Clayton
Functional Ecology
Vol. 10, No. 6 (Dec., 1996), pp. 733-740
DOI: 10.2307/2390508
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2390508
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Effect of Vertically Transmitted Ectoparasites on the Reproductive Success of Swifts (Apus apus)
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Parasites that are transmitted vertically from parent hosts to offspring are expected to be relatively benign, because their fitness depends on successful host reproduction. The effects of two species of vertically transmitted ectoparasite on the reproductive success of swifts (Apus apus L.) were tested. Populations of the Chewing Louse, Dennyus hirundinis (L.) (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae), and the Flightless Louse Fly, Crataerina pallida (Latreille) (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), were experimentally manipulated, effectively converting the natural aggregated frequency distribution of each species into a bimodal distribution of high and low loads. 2. Neither parasite had any effect on nestling growth or fledging success, even though parasite loads were boosted above natural levels and host environmental conditions were poor during part of the study, thus increasing the chances of detecting an effect of the parasites. 3. In contrast to parasite load, year, brood size and hatch date were all significantly related to components of nestling growth. Year and brood size were also significantly related to fledging success. 4. These results are consistent with theoretical models suggesting that vertically transmitted parasites evolve reduced virulence because they depend on host reproduction for dispersal to new hosts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
733
    733
  • Thumbnail: Page 
734
    734
  • Thumbnail: Page 
735
    735
  • Thumbnail: Page 
736
    736
  • Thumbnail: Page 
737
    737
  • Thumbnail: Page 
738
    738
  • Thumbnail: Page 
739
    739
  • Thumbnail: Page 
740
    740