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Feeling In and Falling Out: An individual differences approach to sense of belonging and frequency of disagreeing among Anglican congregations

Andrew Village
Archiv für Religionspsychologie / Archive for the Psychology of Religion
Vol. 29 (2007), pp. 269-288
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23909990
Page Count: 20
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Abstract

Perceived levels of belonging and frequency of disagreeing with local teaching were assessed in a sample of 404 lay members of the Anglican Church in England. Belonging and disagreeing were inversely related, although occasional disagreement was common even among those who felt entirely at home in their church. The power of individual differences and external factors to predict sense of belonging and frequency of disagreeing was tested using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis. Sense of belonging was strongest among people who, in terms of psychological type, recorded high feeling and high judging scores, who were older, who attended church frequently, and who had low frequency of charismatic practice. Disagreement was most frequent among people who, in terms of psychological type, recorded high intuitive scores, who had experienced higher levels of education and who were in larger congregations. Belonging and disagreeing seemed to be related more to intrinsic and acquired individual differences than to external factors associated with congregations.

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