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Identification and Some Conditions of Organizational Involvement

Michael E. Brown
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Sep., 1969), pp. 346-355
DOI: 10.2307/2391129
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2391129
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification and Some Conditions of Organizational Involvement
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Abstract

Eight hundred thirty four employees in twenty-six organization branches of the Tennessee Valley Authority participated in a survey. Indices were constructed to test a set of hypotheses concerning correlates of identification with the organization. It was predicted that individuals would tend to identify with the organization in three situations: (1) where they saw the organization as providing opportunities for personal achievement; (2) where they had power within the organization; (3) where there were no competing sources of identification. The hypotheses were based on a distinction between two types of satisfactions available within work organizations, symbolic (i.e., achievement-oriented) and pragmatic. Analysis of identification indicated that it depends on the presence of opportunities to satisfy symbolic motivational states. It also indicated that identification as a mode of orientation can be distinguished from other apparently similar modes such as satisfaction. The findings supported the hypotheses, indicating that identification can be observed and that it is related to a distinct worker perspective.

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