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Participation with Supervisor and Subordinate Authoritarianism: A Path-Goal Theory Reconciliation

Randall S. Schuler
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 21, No. 2 (Jun., 1976), pp. 320-325
DOI: 10.2307/2392048
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2392048
Page Count: 6
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Participation with Supervisor and Subordinate Authoritarianism: A Path-Goal Theory Reconciliation
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Abstract

This research sought to reconcile previous studies in which participation and job satisfaction of subordinates were sometimes effectively moderated by their authoritarianism and sometimes not. The degree of task repetitiveness was hypothesized to determine when the authoritarianism of subordinates moderated between their participation with their supervisors and job satisfaction. It was hypothesized that: (1) participation would be satisfying to low-authoritarian subordinates regardless of the degree of task repetitiveness but would be satisfying to high-authoritarian subordinates only on tasks with low repetitiveness. (2) Highly repetitive tasks would be less conducive to ego involvement than low-repetitive tasks. These relationships were tested by questionnaires returned from 353 employees of a manufacturing organization who represented all levels of the hierarchy. The results supported the research, reconciling conflicting results obtained in previous studies.

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