If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Effects of Job Alternatives, Extrinsic Rewards, and Behavioral Commitment on Attitude Toward the Organization: A Field Test of the Insufficient Justification Paradigm

Jeffrey Pfeffer and John Lawler
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 25, No. 1 (Mar., 1980), pp. 38-56
DOI: 10.2307/2392225
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2392225
Page Count: 19
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Effects of Job Alternatives, Extrinsic Rewards, and Behavioral Commitment on Attitude Toward the Organization: A Field Test of the Insufficient Justification Paradigm
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of salary, the availability of job alternatives, tenure, and the length of time in the organization on satisfaction with the organization and on intention to leave were investigated for a random sample of 4,058 respondents drawn from the Carnegie Council's 1969 survey of college and university faculty. Satisfaction with the organization and expressed intention to remain were positively related to the amount of salary, length of time in the organization, and tenure, and were negatively related to the availability of job alternatives. An interaction between behavioral commitment, operationalized as either length of time in the organization or tenure, and the amount of salary was observed. Respondents not behaviorally committed showed a positive relationship between salary and satisfaction. Committed respondents did not show this relationship, and the interaction between behavioral commitment and sufficiency of reward was observed to be stronger in those who had recently had job alternatives. The data indicate that a weak form of the insufficient justification hypothesis can be supported from field studies, but there was no support for the strong form of the hypothesis of a negative relationship between satisfaction and sufficiency of justification.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56