Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

TOKENS OR TOTEMS? ECCENTRIC PROPS IN POSTCOLONIAL RE-ENACTMENTS OF COLONIAL CONSECRATION

Helga Ramsey-Kurz
Literature and Theology
Vol. 21, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 302-316
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23927127
Page Count: 15
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Cite this Item
TOKENS OR TOTEMS? ECCENTRIC PROPS IN POSTCOLONIAL RE-ENACTMENTS OF COLONIAL CONSECRATION
Preview not available

Abstract

During colonial expansion the ceremonial insertion of archetypes of European civilisation into terra nullius served two opposing ends: to make visible territorial claims and to conceal the illegitimacy of these claims. While aware of this ambivalence, modern texts re-enacting colonial spectacles of territorial consecration are not always wholly critical of European cultivating zeal but may also trace a genuinely idealistic impulse in it. The films Fitzcarraldo and The Piano and the novels Oscar and Lucinda and Remembering Babylon are cases in point. They rewrite colonial history by telling intricately ironical stories of failure and ascribing special sacredness to the settings as well as to the mementos of the defeats they recount.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[302]
    [302]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316