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Impetus for Action: A Cultural Analysis of Justice and Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Chinese Society

Jiing-Lih Farh, P. Christopher Earley and Shu-Chi Lin
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Sep., 1997), pp. 421-444
DOI: 10.2307/2393733
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2393733
Page Count: 24
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Impetus for Action: A Cultural Analysis of Justice and Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Chinese Society
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Abstract

To understand variations in citizenship behavior within a culture, we examine the relationship between citizenship behaviors and organizational justice in two studies in a Chinese context, using two cultural characteristics (traditionality and modernity) and one individual (gender) characteristic. In Study 1, we develop an indigenous measure of organizational citizenship behavior and explore the similarities and differences of this measure with its Western counterpart. In Study 2, we use this citizenship behavior measure to test its relationship to justice. Results demonstrate that organizational justice (distributive and procedural) is most strongly related to citizenship behavior for individuals who endorse less traditional, or high modernity, values. In addition, we found the relationship between justice and citizenship behavior to be stronger for men than for women. The studies are discussed in terms of the generality of citizenship behavior and its relation to organizational justice and cultural characteristics.

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