Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Bases of Angiosperm Phylogeny: Chemotaxonomy

D. E. Fairbrothers, T. J. Mabry, R. L. Scogin and B. L. Turner
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 62, No. 3, The Bases of Angiosperm Phylogeny (1975), pp. 765-800
DOI: 10.2307/2395273
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2395273
Page Count: 36
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Bases of Angiosperm Phylogeny: Chemotaxonomy
Preview not available

Abstract

The use of the distribution patterns of plant natural products--alkaloids, terpenes, phenolics, etc.--is well established as a major tool for investigating population structures, species, and phyletic relationships of genera. Here, it is suggested that the distribution patterns of biogenetically closely related substances should be of considerable value for deducing evolutionary relationships at higher taxonomic levels. Approximately 540 plant taxa (cultivars through orders) have been included in approximately 150 systematic serological publications in the last 25 years. Research has demonstrated that extracts of seeds, pollen, leaves, tubers, and spores of vascular plants can be used if the required extraction procedures are followed. Both quantitative and qualitative immunological techniques have provided complementary data which have proven to be provocative and valuable in the classification of higher plants. The examples presented clearly indicate serology has contributed chemical data which can be--and have been--used with other data to aid in producing systems of classification such as those of Cronquist and Takhtajan. The phylogenetic relationships among 15 species belonging to 12 families of vascular plants based on a comparison of cytochrome c amino acid sequences agree in general outline with morphologically based phylogenetic diagrams. Amino acid sequence data on homologous plant proteins are in too limited a supply to permit other than very preliminary phylogenetic comparisons. Acquisition of more data will require considerable time and work before an impact will be realized. Published protein sequence data have not revolutionized presently accepted phylogenetic diagrams, and it is too soon to hint at the ultimate contribution of sequence data to phylogenetic schemes. The technique of nucleic acid hybridization is, in principle, applicable to chemotaxonomy at all taxonomic levels since it involves the fundamental hereditary material deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and its transcribed copy, ribonucleic acid (RNA). In contrast to the relative ease with which meaningful plant natural products distribution patterns are determined, are the difficulties and patience required to carry out nucleic acid hybridization experiments and to interpret the results from them. Thus, it is not surprising that few nucleic acid hybridization data for higher plants are available to meaningfully influence the interpretations of Cronquist and Takhtajan for the evolution of the angiosperms; nevertheless, the method inherently has great potential.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[765]
    [765]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
766
    766
  • Thumbnail: Page 
767
    767
  • Thumbnail: Page 
768
    768
  • Thumbnail: Page 
769
    769
  • Thumbnail: Page 
770
    770
  • Thumbnail: Page 
771
    771
  • Thumbnail: Page 
772
    772
  • Thumbnail: Page 
773
    773
  • Thumbnail: Page 
774
    774
  • Thumbnail: Page 
775
    775
  • Thumbnail: Page 
776
    776
  • Thumbnail: Page 
777
    777
  • Thumbnail: Page 
778
    778
  • Thumbnail: Page 
779
    779
  • Thumbnail: Page 
780
    780
  • Thumbnail: Page 
781
    781
  • Thumbnail: Page 
782
    782
  • Thumbnail: Page 
783
    783
  • Thumbnail: Page 
784
    784
  • Thumbnail: Page 
785
    785
  • Thumbnail: Page 
786
    786
  • Thumbnail: Page 
787
    787
  • Thumbnail: Page 
788
    788
  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790
  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800