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Partitioning and Sharing of Pollinators by Four Sympatric Species of Dalechampia (Euphorbiaceae) in Panama

W. Scott Armbruster and Ann L. Herzig
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 71, No. 1 (1984), pp. 1-16
DOI: 10.2307/2399053
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2399053
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Partitioning and Sharing of Pollinators by Four Sympatric Species of Dalechampia (Euphorbiaceae) in Panama
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Abstract

Observations were made on distribution, floral morphology, and pollination of four species of Dalechampia (Euphorbiaceae) in central Panama. The four species occur sympatrically in various combinations throughout Panama and are pollinated by resin-collecting euglossine bees, and resin-and/or pollen-collecting stingless bees and megachilid bees. With one exception, these plant species overlap very little in pollinators or time of pollination. Dalechampia heteromorpha is pollinated early in the day by Trigona and Hypanthidium whereas a sympatric congener, D. scandens, is pollinated by the same species of bees late in the day. A third sympatric species, D. dioscoreifolia, is pollinated by euglossine bees. Dalechampia heteromorpha also occurs sympatrically with D. tiliifolia; the latter is pollinated by euglossine bees. Individuals of Dalechampia dioscoreifolia and D. tiliifolia were observed occurring together at only one site; here they shared pollinators (euglossine bees) and were receptive to pollination at the same time of day. Interspecific pollen flow was substantial and may have resulted in depressed seedset in D. dioscoreifolia.

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