Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Koehneria, A New Genus of Lythraceae from Madagascar

Shirley A. Graham, Hiroshi Tobe and Pieter Baas
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 73, No. 4 (1986), pp. 788-809
DOI: 10.2307/2399207
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2399207
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Koehneria, A New Genus of Lythraceae from Madagascar
Preview not available

Abstract

The new monotypic genus Koehneria is described, based on Pemphis madagascariensis, one of two species of the lythraceous genus Pemphis. It is distinguished from Pemphis acidula and other members of the Lythraceae by a combination of characters including: glandular trichomes, strongly reflexed calyx lobes, doubled episepalous stamens, a conspicuous ovary stipe, elongated inner epidermal cells of the ovary wall, septifragal capsule dehiscence, 3-pseudocolpate pollen, and wood with septate fibers, scanty parenchyma, and erect ray cells. Morphological, palynological, and anatomical comparison of Koehneria is made to the Old World genera Pemphis, Lagerstroemia, Woodfordia, and the New World genera Adenaria and Pehria. The last three genera share with Koehneria a three-character synapomorphy absent from Pemphis and Lagerstroemia and all other genera of the family. A common ancestral origin is postulated for Koehneria, Woodfordia, Adenaria, and Pehria, but subsequent extensive morphological divergence, together with wide geographic dispersal and extinction of intervening forms, limits understanding of more specific inter-generic relationships.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[788]
    [788]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790
  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
  • Thumbnail: Page 
802
    802
  • Thumbnail: Page 
803
    803
  • Thumbnail: Page 
804
    804
  • Thumbnail: Page 
805
    805
  • Thumbnail: Page 
806
    806
  • Thumbnail: Page 
807
    807
  • Thumbnail: Page 
808
    808
  • Thumbnail: Page 
809
    809