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Monophyly of the Asteridae and Identification of Their Major Lineages Inferred From DNA Sequences of rbcL

Richard G. Olmstead, Helen J. Michaels, Kathy M. Scott and Jeffrey D. Palmer
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 79, No. 2 (1992), pp. 249-265
DOI: 10.2307/2399768
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2399768
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Monophyly of the Asteridae and Identification of Their Major Lineages Inferred From DNA Sequences of rbcL
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Abstract

A parsimony analysis of 57 angiosperm rbcL sequences was conducted to test the monophyly of the Asteridae and to identify major lineages within the Asteridae. Three major clades, the Caryophyllidae, the Rosidae plus Dilleniidae, and the Asteridae sensu lato, emerge from an unresolved radiation in the "higher" dicots. The Asteridae sens. lat. include the Ericales, Cornales, and Apiales in addition to the Asteridae sens. str. Two major lineages within the Asteridae sens. lat. are identified: the Dipsacales, Apiales, Asterales, and Campanulales in one, and the Gentianales, Scrophulariales, Lamiales, Boraginales, and Solanales in the other. This analysis demonstrates the utility of molecular phylogenies to help place problematic taxa, such as the Menyanthaceae, Oleaceae, and Callitrichaceae, within the Asteridae. Implications from this phylogenetic analysis and evidence from the fossil record lead to the suggestion that the origin and diversification of the major higher-dicot lineages occurred during a relatively short period of time about 80-95 million years ago.

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