Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

INTERNAZIONALISMO E DEMOCRAZIA NELLA POLITICA ESTERA WILSONIANA

Giuseppe Bottaro
Il Politico
Vol. 72, No. 2 (215) (Maggio-Agosto 2007), pp. 5-23
Published by: Rubbettino Editore
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24005455
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
INTERNAZIONALISMO E DEMOCRAZIA NELLA POLITICA ESTERA WILSONIANA
Preview not available

Abstract

During the first world war the President of the United States Woodrow Wilson placed the problem to imagine a new international order founded on the self-determination of the people, the spread of democracy, the free international commerce and a world-wide organization of the states - the League of Nations - able to conserve peace in a global context. Wilson, pushed from deep religious motivations, supported the doctrine that the American participation in the conflict meant to make the first step in order to end all wars forever and expressed a vision of international politics devised from the philosophers of enlightenment and the liberal thought in eighteenth and nineteenth century. The program that his administration predisposed between the end of 1917 and the beginning of 1918 expressed the will to diffuse in the European states the ideals of liberal-democracy and self-determination of the people, but it was revealed an utopia since it did not consider the complexity of the European situation. The wilsonian dream of a better future founded on freedom and lacking in conflicts between the nations had, however, its full achievement just in the Fourteen Points, and the consequent constitution of the League of Nations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23