Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Concept of Man in the Maharal's Thought and its Application in the Development of Creativity in Education / תפיסת האדם במשנת המהר"ל והשלכותיה על פיתוח היצירתיות בחינוך

משה מ' וסרשטיין-ורנט and M.M. Wasserstein-Verant
Hagut: Studies in Jewish Educational Thought / הגות: מחקרים בהגות החינוך היהודי
Vol. ב‎ (תש"ס / 2000), pp. 153-172
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24008168
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Concept of Man in the Maharal's Thought and its Application in the Development of Creativity in Education / תפיסת האדם במשנת המהר"ל והשלכותיה על פיתוח היצירתיות בחינוך
Preview not available

Abstract

In our ever-changing society, there is an increasing need for teachers to be creative and to foster creativity. The writer suggests that one of the keys to the development of the child's creativity is the understanding of human nature and its hidden potential. The writer analyses four basic characteristics that in the Maharal's thought are inherent to the uniqueness of human beings. a. Man is constantly in a state of unrealized potential. He always has a potential of perfection to achieve. b. Man must make continual efforts in order to seek and to uncover his real identity. He must always be in the midst of a dynamic process. c. Man must make choices. He can remain at the level of "natural" activities, which are linked mainly to his survival-egocentric preoccupations (for instance: the quest for power, social recognition or simply material or intellectual comfort). Man can also be open, and can risk deviating from his routine view of the world, in a circular and natural fashion, in order to give rein to his potential for transformation of self and of surroundings. d. Man's reality is paradoxical: he relates both to the spiritual, qualitative world and to the natural world. The writer discusses to what extent the Maharal's perception of human nature can open new horizons for the practices and goals of modern education. In the perspective of the Maharal's thought, he proposes different strategies for the development of creativity in the education system. In particular, he stresses the importance of an interactive and evolutive vision of the student's potential, with the ability to adapt to the student's level of maturity and personality development, and to reinforce the ability to make choices.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172