If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Roles of Mass Extinction and Biotic Interaction in Large-Scale Replacements: A Reexamination Using the Fossil Record of Stromboidean Gastropods

Kaustuv Roy
Paleobiology
Vol. 22, No. 3 (Summer, 1996), pp. 436-452
Published by: Paleontological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2401099
Page Count: 17
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Roles of Mass Extinction and Biotic Interaction in Large-Scale Replacements: A Reexamination Using the Fossil Record of Stromboidean Gastropods
Preview not available

Abstract

The macroevolutionary processes underlying large-scale biotic replacements are still poorly understood. Opinion remains divided regarding the roles of mass extinction, biotic interaction, and environmental perturbations in these replacement events. Previous attempts to test replacement hypotheses have largely focused on taxonomic diversity patterns. Taxonomic data alone, however, provide little insight about ecological interactions and hence other approaches are needed to understand mechanics of biotic replacements. Here I propose a conceptual model of replacement based on predation-mediated biotic interactions, and attempt a test using analysis of the Cenozoic replacement of the gastropod family Aporrhaidae by a closely related group, the Strombidae. Taxonomic, morphologic, and geographic data analyzed in this study all suggest a replacement of aporrhaids by strombids following the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. While most of the taxonomic replacement was associated with a mass extinction, some replacement also occurred during background times and was mediated by higher origination rates in strombids rather than by higher extinction rates in aporrhaids. Morphologically, the replacement was largely confined to the portion of the morphospace unaffected by the end-Cretaceous extinction. At a global scale, the geographic overlap between the two groups declined through the Cenozoic, reflecting increasing restriction of aporrhaids to colder, temperate waters while strombids flourished in the tropics. However, at a finer geographic scale a more mosaic pattern of replacement is evident and coincides with Eocene and Oligocene climatic fluctuations. The results of this study suggest that mass extinction, long-term biotic interaction, and environmental change can all play significant roles in biotic replacements. Since the relative importance of each factor would vary from one event to another, an understanding of the general nature of large-scale biotic replacements requires a knowledge of the relative intensities of each of these processes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[436]
    [436]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452