Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Pesticide Monitoring System with Special Reference to the Selection of Indicator Species

N. W. Moore
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 3, Supplement: Pesticides in the Environment and Their Effects on Wildlife. (Jun., 1966), pp. 261-269
DOI: 10.2307/2401465
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2401465
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Pesticide Monitoring System with Special Reference to the Selection of Indicator Species
Preview not available

Abstract

Measures of changes in environmental contamination by persistent pesticides are required to assess their effects on wildlife and to check the efficiency of control measures. Indicator species for pesticide monitoring should be widely distributed, abundant and easy to collect. Animals should be large enough for chemical analysis, and if possible of known age. For monitoring local conditions they must be as sedentary as possible. Species whose present residue levels lie between the limit of detection and levels which indicate toxicological significance are preferable. Permanent sampling sites should be chosen subjectively. A reconnaissance to discover suitable indicator species in Britain is described. It is suggested that the eggs of seabirds should be used for measuring changes in general contamination and that the Northern Pike (Esox lucius) and Eel (Anguilla anguilla) may be suitable for studying local changes. The selection of species for an international monitoring system are discussed. Proposals for establishing a rudimentary international monitoring system are suggested.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269