Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Behaviour of Bees Visiting Runner Beans (Phaseolus multiflorus)

J. B. Free
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 5, No. 3 (Dec., 1968), pp. 631-638
DOI: 10.2307/2401637
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2401637
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Behaviour of Bees Visiting Runner Beans (Phaseolus multiflorus)
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Bombus agrorum foragers entered the mouths of runner-bean flowers and collected nectar only or nectar and pollen: some kept constant to one or other occupation. 2. Most B. lucorum and B. terrestris foragers obtained nectar through holes they bit in the bases of the corolla tubes. 3. Most honeybees collected nectar either by entering the flowers, or by robbing nectar through holes bitten by B. lucorum and B. terrestris; very few honeybees collected pollen. The number of honeybees robbing the flowers depended on the number of B. lucorum and B. terrestris present. Nectar-gathering honeybees readily changed from robbing to collecting nectar via the mouths of the flowers and vice versa. 4. The numbers of bumblebees and honeybees gathering pollen were greatest between 08.00 and 10.00 hours and the numbers robbing were greatest during the late afternoon. 5. Bumblebees worked faster and visited more flowers per plant than honeybees and probably their foraging areas on a single trip were no greater than honeybees. However, their foraging areas during several trips were larger.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
631
    631
  • Thumbnail: Page 
632
    632
  • Thumbnail: Page 
633
    633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
638
    638