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The Transport of Pollen on the Body Hairs of Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) and Bumblebees (Bombus Spp. L.)

J. B. Free and Ingrid H. Williams
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 9, No. 2 (Aug., 1972), pp. 609-615
DOI: 10.2307/2402458
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2402458
Page Count: 7
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The Transport of Pollen on the Body Hairs of Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) and Bumblebees (Bombus Spp. L.)
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Abstract

Pollen is transferred between bees as they brush against each other inside the hive, so that much of the pollen on the bodies of bees leaving to forage comes from species other than the crop on which they are working. The pollen being collected most abundantly by a colony occurs on most of its bees. Many foraging bees still carry some 'foreign' pollen on their bodies, but because it is more diluted with pollen from the crop being worked, pollen-gatherers have proportionally less 'foreign' pollen than nectar-gatherers.

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