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Ecosystem Development on Reclaimed China Clay Wastes: I. Assessment of Vegetation and Capture of Nutrients

R. H. Marrs, R. D. Roberts and A. D. Bradshaw
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 17, No. 3 (Dec., 1980), pp. 709-717
DOI: 10.2307/2402649
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2402649
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecosystem Development on Reclaimed China Clay Wastes: I. Assessment of Vegetation and Capture of Nutrients
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Abstract

(1) In a survey of sixty-eight reclaimed china clay wastes, vegetation was scored for overall cover, legume cover and the number of ingressed species, and the accumulation of biomass and major plant nutrients was measured at forty-three sites. (2) Vegetation cover was adequate for slope and sand stabilization, and at certain sites there was a high legume component which contributed to the nitrogen economy of the vegetation. There was limited ingression of new species into these reclaimed areas. (3) Organic matter and most major plant nutrients accumulated in these new ecosystems. An overall nutrient budget comparing inputs from atmospheric deposition and fertilizer sources to net accumulation within these ecosystems showed a net loss of all elements measured with the exception of nitrogen and to a lesser extent phosphorus. In the case of nitrogen there was an overall accumulation in excess of measured inputs reflecting the influence of leguminous species.

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