Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ecosystem Development on Reclaimed China Clay Wastes II. Nutrient Compartmentation and Nitrogen Mineralization

R. D. Roberts, R. H. Marrs and A. D. Bradshaw
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 17, No. 3 (Dec., 1980), pp. 719-725
DOI: 10.2307/2402650
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2402650
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecosystem Development on Reclaimed China Clay Wastes II. Nutrient Compartmentation and Nitrogen Mineralization
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The accumulation of biomass and nutrients in three compartments (plant shoots, roots and surface soil) in developing ecosystems in two types of reclaimed china clay waste, sand tips and mica dam walls was measured. Biomass and nitrogen accumulated mainly in the root compartment whereas all other elements measured with the exception of potassium in mica dam wall soils, accumulated in the soil fraction. (2) The accumulation of nutrients in the shoot and root pools was not due to redistribution of nutrients from the soil pool as accumulation was demonstrated in all three pools. (3) Soil nitrogen mineralization tests showed an increase in mineralizable nitrogen in the reclaimed waste compared to the raw waste. A significant correlation with age since treatment was demonstrated for sand tip soils. (4) The importance of nutrient cycling and of nitrogen cycling in particular in recently established ecosystems, such as reclaimed china clay wastes is emphasized. The relative contributions to nitrogen cycling from mineralization and grazing sources are discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
719
    719
  • Thumbnail: Page 
720
    720
  • Thumbnail: Page 
721
    721
  • Thumbnail: Page 
722
    722
  • Thumbnail: Page 
723
    723
  • Thumbnail: Page 
724
    724
  • Thumbnail: Page 
725
    725