If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Seed Banks and Propagule Dispersal in Crested-Wheatgrass Stands

Guy M. Marlette and Jay E. Anderson
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Apr., 1986), pp. 161-175
DOI: 10.2307/2403089
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2403089
Page Count: 15

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Seedlings, Seed banks, Vegetation, Seeds, Plants, Soil ecology, Topsoil, Native species, Forbs, Rangeland soils
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seed Banks and Propagule Dispersal in Crested-Wheatgrass Stands
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Crested wheatgrasses (Agropyron cristatum and A. desertorum) are well adapted to semi-arid regions and are often sown in pure stands for land reclamation. Stands dominated by crested wheatgrass are exceptionally stable. This study was designed to investigate reasons for this stability. (2) Four areas previously sown with crested wheatgrass were compared with adjacent native plant communities. Cover of the existing vegetation and seed banks in soils were examined. The distribution of propagules of Elymus elymoides, a species with high potential for wind dispersal, was also studied. (3) Crested wheatgrass strongly dominated the seed banks where it occurred in pure stands and was co-dominant with Artemisia tridentata in the seed banks of seeded areas where native species were becoming re-established. Seedling emergence data indicated that the rain of native propagules into seeded areas is sparse. Stand stability may be largely a consequence of dominance of the seed bank by crested wheatgrass. (4) For many species, including the dominants, the abundance of viable propagules in the soil was closely associated with the distribution of mature plants. Cover, seedling emergence, and propagule dispersal for Elymus elymoides were closely intercorrelated. Dispersal of this species into crested-wheatgrass stands was very sparse despite an abundant seed source. (5) The relative abundances of species represented in the soil seed bank were significantly correlated with the composition of the vegetation for three of the four native communities. No such correlation existed within seeded areas. At all sites, species that were dominant in the vegetation were usually also dominant in the seed bank of associated soils. (6) Seeding disturbed areas of shrub-steppe with crested wheatgrass usually retards the development of a diverse plant community. If an increase in species' diversity is desired, existing crested-wheatgrass plants and their propagules in the soil must be destroyed and other species deliberately introduced.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175