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Journal Article

Chillingham Park and its Herd of White Cattle: Relationships Between Vegetation Classes and Patterns of Range Use

S. J. G. Hall
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 25, No. 3 (Dec., 1988), pp. 777-789
DOI: 10.2307/2403745
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2403745
Page Count: 13

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Topics: Vegetation, Social classes, Herds, Cattle, Calves, Grasses, Grazing behavior, Indicator species, Grazing, Pastures
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Chillingham Park and its Herd of White Cattle: Relationships Between Vegetation Classes and Patterns of Range Use
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Abstract

(1) Chillingham Park is a 134-ha tract of woodland and permanent grassland in northern England, grazed by a herd of white cattle. Indicator species analysis defined sixteen vegetation classes. (2) Bulls 4 or more years old shared home ranges, stable from year to year. The most dominant bull had the home range with the largest area of good grazing. (3) The size, botanical composition and location of the home ranges of the other bulls were not explicable purely in terms of social status. (4) The cattle used the different vegetation classes in a similar fashion from year to year, certain classes being favoured and others avoided. In spring, late autumn and winter, cows differed markedly from calves in their use of the various vegetation classes. (5) Indicator species analysis characterized Chillingham Park in a manner useful for ecological interpretation of patterns of behaviour of these cattle. This is believed to be its first application in a study of ungulate ecology.

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