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Analysis of Biological Control of Cassava Pests in Africa. III. Cassava Green Mite Mononychellus tanajoa

A. P. Gutierrez, J. S. Yaninek, B. Wermelinger, H. R. Herren and C. K. Ellis
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 25, No. 3 (Dec., 1988), pp. 941-950
DOI: 10.2307/2403756
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2403756
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Analysis of Biological Control of Cassava Pests in Africa. III. Cassava Green Mite Mononychellus tanajoa
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Abstract

(1) The interactions of cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar) s.l., and cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz, under West African weather and soil conditions were examined using a simulation model. (2) Field studies had demonstrated the effects of plant and leaf age and rainfall-induced mortality on M. tanajoa population growth. In the absence of effective natural enemies, the model explains, in order of importance, the effects of rainfall, drought stress via the host-plant, food availability (production and persistence of new foliage) and leaf quality (N concentration) on M. tanajoa population growth. (3) Rainfall-induced mortality greatly reduced M. tanajoa populations in the rainy season, drought and N stresses acting indirectly via food availability being most important in the dry season. (4) The combined effects of M. tanajoa feeding and water and N stress on cassava tuber yield were assessed.

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