Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Calcium delivery and storage in plant leaves: exploring the link with water flow

Matthew Gilliham, Maclin Dayod, Bradleigh J. Hocking, Bo Xu, Simon J. Conn, Brent N. Kaiser, Roger A. Leigh and Stephen D. Tyerman
Journal of Experimental Botany
Vol. 62, No. 7, Special Issue: Plant Membrance Biology (2011), pp. 2233-2250
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24039129
Page Count: 18

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Plants, Plant cells, Water flow, Calcium, Leaves, Aquaporins, Transpiration, Cell membranes, Cell walls, Xylem
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

Calcium (Ca) is a unique macronutrient with diverse but fundamental physiological roles in plant structure and signalling. In the majority of crops the largest proportion of long-distance calcium ion (Ca 2+ ) transport through plant tissues has been demonstrated to follow apoplastic pathways, although this paradigm is being increasingly challenged. Similarly, under certain conditions, apoplastic pathways can dominate the proportion of water flow through plants. Therefore, tissue Ca supply is often found to be tightly linked to transpiration. Once Ca is deposited in vacuoles it is rarely redistributed, which results in highly transpiring organs amassing large concentrations of Ca ([Ca]). Meanwhile, the nutritional flow of Ca 2+ must be regulated so it does not interfere with signalling events. However, water flow through plants is itself regulated by Ca 2+ , both in the apoplast via effects on cell wall structure and stomatal aperture, and within the symplast via Ca 2+ -mediated gating of aquaporins which regulates flow across membranes. In this review, an integrated model of water and Ca 2+ movement through plants is developed and how this affects [Ca] distribution and water flow within tissues is discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of aquaporins.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[2233]
    [2233]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2234
    2234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2235
    2235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2236
    2236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2237
    2237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2238
    2238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2239
    2239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2240
    2240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2241
    2241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2242
    2242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2243
    2243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2244
    2244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2245
    2245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2246
    2246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2247
    2247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2248
    2248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2249
    2249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2250
    2250