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The Emergence of Dengue Fever in the United States and Its Public Health Implications

Sabrina Manning-Gilliam
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers
Vol. 57 (1995), pp. 32-43
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24040063
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Emergence of Dengue Fever in the United States and Its Public Health Implications
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Abstract

Dengue fever has been considered a tropical disease because of specific climatic conditions necessary for the survival of its mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, and the lack of adequate mosquito control measured in tropical regions. Owing to the high volume of international exchange of both commodities and people, however, the United States is especially vulnerable to introduced dengue. The recent addition of a second vector, Aedes albopictus, and the rising number of imported cases of dengue make U.S. health officials increasingly wary of the disease. International trade, tourism, and immigration are prominent vehicles for dengue introduction and spread in the United States. Identifying these portals of entry for the virus and the two vectors will aid researchers in defining high-risk regions for dengue fever outbreaks. The public health implications of dengue in the United States are also addressed.

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