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Post-Gold Rush Population Changes in a Sierra Nevada Mining Region

Lary M. Dilsaver
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers
Vol. 45 (1983), pp. 101-115
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24040335
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Post-Gold Rush Population Changes in a Sierra Nevada Mining Region
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Abstract

The California gold rush commonly is perceived to have ended with a mass emigration to other promising mining sites, leaving behind ghost towns and abandoned mining fields where once thousands worked. Empirical archival evidence, however, shows this to be a misleading conclusion. Tests show that while almost all of the population of the rush era departed between 1860 and 1880, these early miners were replaced by two new groups, men seeking nonplacer mining work and their dependents.

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