Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Agents for Biological Control of Novel Hosts: Assessing an Aleocharine Parasitoid of Dung-Breeding Files

E. Jane Wright, Petra Muller and John D. Kerr
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 26, No. 2 (Aug., 1989), pp. 453-461
DOI: 10.2307/2404073
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2404073
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Agents for Biological Control of Novel Hosts: Assessing an Aleocharine Parasitoid of Dung-Breeding Files
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Host acceptance and suitability of a range of dipterous hosts of the predator/parasitoid Aleochara sp. (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae) were studied in South Africa to assess the likelihood of the parasitoid attacking the novel target pest Haematobia irritans exigua De Meijere, in Australia. (2) In laboratory experiments, first instar parasitoids were presented with puparia of Haematobia thirouxi potans (Bezzi) and other candidate host species in choice and nochoice tests. Parasitized puparia were reared to determine survival and parasitoid size. (3) Some species were not acceptable as hosts. The parasitoid larvae were apparently attracted to, but could not penetrate the puparium of Musca xanthomelas Wiedemann. They penetrated, but did not feed on, Musca sorbens Weidemann and died in the first instar. (4) The remaining hosts tested, Borborillus marginatus (Adams), Sepsis thoracica Robineau-Desvoidy, H. thirouxi potans, Musca domestica L. and Orthellia peronii (Robineau-Desvoidy), were penetrated and consumed, with resulting development to a range of parasitoid sizes and with variable survival rates. The relationship between a preference index and the log10 of host mass was quadratic, with preference relative to H. thirouxi potans increasing with increasing host mass up to 8 mg and decreasing thereafter. Parasitoid mass increased but survival decreased with increasing host mass. (5) From the size of field-collected Aleochara sp., the relationships determined in the laboratory, and the ecology and mass of H. irritans exigua in Australia, it is considered likely that Aleochara sp. would accept and develop successfully on the target species in Australia.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
453
    453
  • Thumbnail: Page 
454
    454
  • Thumbnail: Page 
455
    455
  • Thumbnail: Page 
456
    456
  • Thumbnail: Page 
457
    457
  • Thumbnail: Page 
458
    458
  • Thumbnail: Page 
459
    459
  • Thumbnail: Page 
460
    460
  • Thumbnail: Page 
461
    461