Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

The Effects of Grazing Management on the Vegetation of Mesotrophic (Meadow) Grassland in Northern England

R. S. Smith and S. P. Rushton
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 31, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), pp. 13-24
DOI: 10.2307/2404595
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2404595
Page Count: 12

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Species, Vegetation, Meadows, Grazing, Grazing management, Grasses, Applied ecology, Biomass, Seed banks, Plants
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effects of Grazing Management on the Vegetation of Mesotrophic (Meadow) Grassland in Northern England
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Haymeadows in the Yorkshire Dales and the North Pennines in Northern England are grazed with cattle and sheep outside the 2-3-month summer period, when a hay or silage crop is grown. Experimental exclosures were used from August 1987 to June 1991 to prevent this grazing for various periods in the year in a meadow at Ravenstonedale, Cumbria. Vegetation change was investigated using biomass samples taken in June of each year. 2. Experimental treatments were: (i) no grazing at any time of the year; (ii) no grazing from the time of the hay cut until 1 January; (iii) no grazing from 1 January to the time of the hay cut; (iv) control plots in which the normal grazing regime was followed each year. All other management factors were kept constant. 3. All plots showed vegetation changes related to treatment and to time. The main trend was the treatment effect, with the greatest reduction in species richness occurring in the ungrazed plots. Changes in the species composition of the plots were associated with species' strategies (sensu Grime 1979) in the established and regenerative phase. 4. The results are discussed in the context of management designed to manipulate plant species composition in old meadowland.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[13]
    [13]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
Part of Sustainability