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Journal Article

The Effect of Habitat Fragmentation and Livestock Grazing on Animal Communities in Remnants of Gimlet Eucalyptus salubris Woodland in the Western Australian Wheatbelt. II. Lizards

G. T. Smith, G. W. Arnold, S. Sarre, M. Abensperg-Traun and D. E. Steven
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 33, No. 6 (Dec., 1996), pp. 1302-1310
DOI: 10.2307/2404771
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2404771
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Habitat Fragmentation and Livestock Grazing on Animal Communities in Remnants of Gimlet Eucalyptus salubris Woodland in the Western Australian Wheatbelt. II. Lizards
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Abstract

1. The study examined relationships between habitat and biogeographic variables and the presence of lizard groups and individual lizard species in remnants of gimlet Eucalyptus salubris woodland in the Western Australian wheatbelt. 2. The lizard species found in various gimlet woodland remnants are sub-sets of those found prior to fragmentation. 3. Regression analysis showed that woodly litter, percentage shrub cover and number of trees were the only habitat variables to influence species richness of the lizard taxa. Area, connectivity and distance to the nearest native vegetatation were the only biogeographic variables to influence species richness of geckos, 'other' lizards and total lizards. 4. Three individual species showed no significant relationships with any variables, whereas three species had significant relationships to variables related to cover/shelter only. 5. Disturbance from sheep grazing and trampling had no influence on the species richness of the different lizard taxa, but may have influenced the persistence of individual species in some remnants. 6. Implications of our findings for management of remnant vegetation are discussed.

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