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Spatial Relationships Between Iberian Lynx and Other Carnivores in an Area of South-Western Spain

F. Palomares, P. Ferreras, J. M. Fedriani and M. Delibes
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 33, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 5-13
DOI: 10.2307/2405010
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2405010
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial Relationships Between Iberian Lynx and Other Carnivores in an Area of South-Western Spain
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Abstract

1. Spatial relationships between Iberian lynx and other carnivores were studied by radio-tracking and/or track censusing in two adjacent areas of Donana (south-western Spain). 2. Both radio-tracking and track censusing showed that lynx were restricted to an undisturbed area of Pistacia lentiscus shrubs called Matasgordas. Minimum and maximum lynx density in Matasgordas were estimated as 0.55 and 0.75 ind. km-2. 3. Egyptian mongoose tracks were mainly detected outside Matasgordas (83% of tracks), European badger tracks were detected most often inside Matasgordas (76% of tracks), and red fox tracks were frequently detected both outside (54%) and inside (46%) Matasgordas. Surveys of tracks and faeces undertaken in other 14 areas where P. lentiscus shrubs also dominated corroborated the census data obtained inside and outside Matasgordas. 4. Trapping and radio-tracking of mongooses and common genets indicated that both species avoided use of Matasgordas. They were almost exclusively trapped (24 out of 25 mongooses and all of 11 genets) and mainly radio-located (94.5% and 95.4% of times, for mongooses and genets, respectively) in the areas of P. lentiscus shrubs situated outside Matasgordas. Their densities were estimated as 0.2 and 0.03 ind. km-2 inside, and as 2.0 and 0.7 ind. km-2 outside Matasgordas for mongooses and genets, respectively. 5. Lynx may kill mongooses, genets, and foxes; thus, the avoidance of Matasgordas by smaller carnivores (mongooses and genets) could be related to the risk of lynx predation. It is suggested that the decline of the lynx in the Donana area may have caused the increase in the population size of smaller, previously rarer carnivores. 6. The true relationship between lynx and foxes remains unclear, and badgers were apparently indifferent to lynx presence or absence.

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