Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effects of Plantation Forestry on Birds in New Zealand

M. N. Clout and P. D. Gaze
Journal of Applied Ecology
Vol. 21, No. 3 (Dec., 1984), pp. 795-815
DOI: 10.2307/2405048
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2405048
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Plantation Forestry on Birds in New Zealand
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The relative densities of birds were compared, vegetation profiles measured and bird food resources assessed in seven exotic conifer plantations and five areas of native Nothofagus forest in New Zealand. (2) Of sixteen native bird species, seven were most abundant in native forest and two in conifer plantations. In contrast, none of the ten introduced birds preferred native forest, but at least seven were commonest in plantations. (3) There was no significant relationship between overall bird species richness (BSR) and foliage height diversity (FHD). However, when introduced and native birds were considered separately, the BSR of introduced species was negatively correlated with FHD whereas BSR of native birds was positively correlated with FHD. Several introduced passerines preferred structurally simple plantations, but there were always more native bird species in native forest than in plantations. (4) The distribution of birds between areas was largely explained by the differing availability of food such as fruit and honeydew, but for some species vegetation structure or the presence of tree-holes for nesting may be important factors. (5) The native birds which suffer most from replacement of native forest with conifer plantations are frugivores, nectar-feeders and hole-nesters. Conservation of these species in large exotic forests is best achieved by retaining areas of native forest within conifer plantations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
  • Thumbnail: Page 
802
    802
  • Thumbnail: Page 
803
    803
  • Thumbnail: Page 
804
    804
  • Thumbnail: Page 
805
    805
  • Thumbnail: Page 
806
    806
  • Thumbnail: Page 
807
    807
  • Thumbnail: Page 
808
    808
  • Thumbnail: Page 
809
    809
  • Thumbnail: Page 
810
    810
  • Thumbnail: Page 
811
    811
  • Thumbnail: Page 
812
    812
  • Thumbnail: Page 
813
    813
  • Thumbnail: Page 
814
    814
  • Thumbnail: Page 
815
    815