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Barriers to Gene Exchange Between Members of the Mimulus guttatus Complex (Scrophulariaceae)

Robert K. Vickery, Jr.
Evolution
Vol. 18, No. 1 (Mar., 1964), pp. 52-69
DOI: 10.2307/2406419
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2406419
Page Count: 18
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Barriers to Gene Exchange Between Members of the Mimulus guttatus Complex (Scrophulariaceae)
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Abstract

The Mimulus guttatus complex of related species is in all stages of evolutionary divergence. Its scattered populations vary greatly in their morphology and physiology. They exhibit numerous crossing barriers that vary from subtle ones in typical M. guttatus populations, to moderate ones, to those so strong or numerous in some of the peripheral members as to indicate that at least one new species has evolved, culture 5327 of M. nasutus. The proper designation of this new species must await a detailed study of the taxonomic literature and type specimens. Mimulus platycalyx and M. glaucescens are strongly although not completely isolated by barriers. They probably should be considered as clearly differentiated subspecies. Mimulus laciniatus and the n = 14 M. nasutus populations cross readily with M. guttatus and represent compatible but morphologically well-marked subspecies. Within the complex, the pronounced evolutionary diversification of the populations in some cases does and in others does not accompany the equally pronounced evolution of numerous crossing barriers.

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