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Natural Selection, Social Organization, Hairlessness, and the Australopithecine Canine

G. E. Hutchinson
Evolution
Vol. 17, No. 4 (Dec., 1963), pp. 588-589
DOI: 10.2307/2407110
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407110
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

Following Darwin's idea that the reduction of the canine and the increased of use of objets trouves as a weapon evolved correlatively, it is suggested that the canine reduction was a morphological parallel to the evolution of appeasement behavior exhibited by many vertebrates, as the loss of hair increased the danger of canine wounds the process, if it occurred, must have been initiated at least early in the Pliocene, if not before.

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