Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Phenetic Analysis and the Phylogeny of the Diploid Species of Gossypium L. (Malvaceae)

Paul A. Fryxell
Evolution
Vol. 25, No. 3 (Sep., 1971), pp. 554-562
DOI: 10.2307/2407355
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407355
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phenetic Analysis and the Phylogeny of the Diploid Species of Gossypium L. (Malvaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

The Wagner Divergence Index was used to evaluate phylogenetic patterns of the diploid species of Gossypium. This phenetic analysis was compared with previously proposed phylogenetic schemes for the genus that have largely been based on evidence from chromosome pairing of interspecific hybrids. The two approaches agree in broad outline but differ in certain particulars. Discussion was also devoted to the significance of data derived from the electrophoretic analysis of seed proteins of Gossypium spp. The most notable discrepancies concern the Australian species, which, in the phenetic analysis, fall into three widely divergent lineages. Previous studies, however, have generally grouped them monophyletically. A discussion of the strong and weak points of the two approaches concludes that the cytogenetic approach is less likely to be misled by parallel and convergent evolutionary patterns, but tends to overestimate the strength of species affinity. Phenetic analysis, on the other hand, has complementary qualities and presents a truer picture of species affinity, but it is capable of being misled by parallelism.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558
  • Thumbnail: Page 
559
    559
  • Thumbnail: Page 
560
    560
  • Thumbnail: Page 
561
    561
  • Thumbnail: Page 
562
    562