Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Clonal Diversity in the Unisexual Fish Poeciliopsis monacha-lucida: A Tissue Graft Analysis

Robert A. Angus and R. Jack Schultz
Evolution
Vol. 33, No. 1, Part 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 27-40
DOI: 10.2307/2407362
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407362
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Clonal Diversity in the Unisexual Fish Poeciliopsis monacha-lucida: A Tissue Graft Analysis
Preview not available

Abstract

Clonal variability and the factors affecting variability were examined in populations of the hybridogenetic unisexual fish Poeciliopsis monacha-lucida from northwest Mexico. Tissue grafting, a sensitive indicator of genetic differences between individuals, was used to analyze the clonal structure of populations some distance apart and in different habitats. Fish scales were chosen as donor tissue since their use permits multiple tissue exchanges between individuals. Studies confirming the suitability of scales for grafting experiments with unisexual fishes are presented. Tissue grafting proved to be a more sensitive technqiue for detecting clonal variability in unisexual vertebrate populations than electrophoresis. A previous electrophoretic survey of 22 protein loci identified eight different phenotypes among the 30 unisexual strains used in this study. In contrast, tissue grafting revealed 18 distinct histocompatibility genotypes among the same 30 strains. The evidence indicates that multiple hybrid origins have been the most significant source of clonal variability in these unisexuals. Some of the clones identified are widespread and have existed for at least 12 years. The importance of both selective and nonselective processes in determining the clonal composition of populations are discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40