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Reproductive Character Displacement in Calopteryx (Odonata: calopterygidae)

Jonathan K. Waage
Evolution
Vol. 33, No. 1, Part 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 104-116
DOI: 10.2307/2407369
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407369
Page Count: 13
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Reproductive Character Displacement in Calopteryx (Odonata: calopterygidae)
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Abstract

Previous work on species discrimination and reproductive isolation in the damselflies, Calopteryx maculata (De Beauvois) and C. aequabilis (Say) (Waage, 1975), suggested that divergence between these species in wing coloration would be favored by selection where they were sympatric. Some evidence for such a divergence was presented. This paper provides quantitative documentation of this divergence and proposes that it be considered a verified example of reproductive character displacement. The evidence presented is derived from collections along a transect across the area of sympatry and into regions of allopatry for each species. The divergence in wing coloration is shown to be unique to the area of sympatry and not the result of trends established in allopatry. The patterns of divergence are exactly those predicted by previous work on species discrimination and cannot be easily explained as variation correlated with latitude, length of the juvenile period, or other aspects of Calopteryx biology. The degree of divergence in each species appears to reflect its abundance relative to that of the other species. Factors that might account for the apparent paucity of examples of character displacement in the context of reproductive isolation are discussed.

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