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Journal Article

Neighborhood Size in Viola

Andrew J. Beattie and David C. Culver
Evolution
Vol. 33, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 1226-1229
DOI: 10.2307/2407481
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407481
Page Count: 4
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Neighborhood Size in Viola
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Abstract

The structure of West Virginia populations of Viola blanda, V pedata, V pensylvanica, and V rostrata were studied. Three dispersal phases contribute to the neighborhood area of these species-the movement of pollinators, the ballistic dispersal of seeds, and the ant dispersal of seeds. For all species studied, seed movement was much less than pollen movement. All three dispersal processes were non-normal-pollen flow and ballistic seed dispersal were leptokurtic and ant dispersal of seeds was usually platykurtic. Departures from normality were taken into account in the calculation of neighborhood area and effective population size. Population sizes for all but V pedata were on the order of 100, so that random effects may be important in their evolution. Population sizes of V pedata were several hundred and random effects are unlikely to be important. Pollinator characteristics are the major factor in determining neighborhood area and size.

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