Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A General Model to Account for Enzyme Variation in Natural Populations. III. Multiple Alleles

John H. Gillespie
Evolution
Vol. 31, No. 1 (Mar., 1977), pp. 85-90
DOI: 10.2307/2407547
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407547
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A General Model to Account for Enzyme Variation in Natural Populations. III. Multiple Alleles
Preview not available

Abstract

The recent findings of increased numbers of alleles at enzyme loci suggests that models of balancing selection must use biologically motivated constraints of the fitnesses if stable, multiple-allele equilibria are to be explained. The constraints introduced in Gillespie (1976) that enzyme activity is an additive trait across alleles and that fitness is a concave function of enzyme activity--is shown in this paper to allow the maintainance of an arbitrarily large number of alleles in a randomly fluctuating environment. The condition for polymorphism for n alleles requires, roughly, that the mean difference in activity between neighboring homozygous genotypes is less than twice the variance in activity divided by the square of the number of alleles.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90