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Genetic Capacity for Adaptation to Cold Resistance at Different Developmental Stages of Drosophila melanogaster

Nikola Tucić
Evolution
Vol. 33, No. 1, Part 2 (Mar., 1979), pp. 350-358
DOI: 10.2307/2407625
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2407625
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Genetic Capacity for Adaptation to Cold Resistance at Different Developmental Stages of Drosophila melanogaster
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Abstract

We have studied in Drosophila melanogaster the effect of selection for cold resistance at five different stages of development: eggs, early larvae, late larvae, pupae, and adults. Selection for 52 generations resulted in a substantial increase in cold resistance between 73 (pupae and larvae) and 560 (adult) -fold at particular developmental stages. The realized heritabilities for cold resistance were 6.7% for eggs, 4.7 for early larvae, 4.1% for late larvae, 7.3% for pupae, and 14.0% for adults. We have also determined the relative contribution of the genes located on each major chromosome at each of the developmental stages. Genes on chromosome 2 contribute most to the cold resistance of eggs and pupae, while those located on chromosome 3 contributed most at larval and adult stages. Increased cold resistance due to selection at a particular stage of development was accompanied by improvement in cold resistance at other stages; this effect was greatest for the one or two developmental stages chronologically closest to the one being selected. Resistance to freezing however was not increased by these treatments. These results indicate that a capacity for cold resistance adaptation exists at all developmental stages of D melanogaster. Therefore it seems possible that genetic control of any of these stages could be selected for overwintering.

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