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Aphid Genotypes, Plant Phenotypes, and Genetic Diversity: A Demographic Analysis of Experimental Data

Philip M. Service and Richard E. Lenski
Evolution
Vol. 36, No. 6 (Nov., 1982), pp. 1276-1282
DOI: 10.2307/2408159
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408159
Page Count: 7
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Aphid Genotypes, Plant Phenotypes, and Genetic Diversity: A Demographic Analysis of Experimental Data
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Abstract

Two clones of the aphid Uroleucon rudbeckiae were grown on a single clone of the host plant Rudbeckia laciniata. Four different host phenotypes were created by growing plants at two light intensities and under two watering regimes. Age-specific fecundity and survivorship were obtained for individual aphids. These data were used to calculate the lifetime contribution of each aphid, F'i, to population growth. F'i is an estimate of individual fitness, and is distinguished from adaptedness. An analysis of covariance with F'i as the dependent variable revealed: (1) an effect due to aphid clone; (2) an effect due to water treatment; (3) an effect due to the aphid clone × light intensity interaction; and (4) effects due to uncontrolled phenotypic differences among individual host plants. In a stepwise regression, age of first reproduction, daily reproductive output, and age of death all contributed significantly to variation in F'i. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that genotype × environment interactions maintain clonal diversity in aphid populations.

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