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Evolution of Host Plant Utilization in Laboratory Populations of the Southern Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

Steven S. Wasserman and Douglas J. Futuyma
Evolution
Vol. 35, No. 4 (Jul., 1981), pp. 605-617
DOI: 10.2307/2408234
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408234
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evolution of Host Plant Utilization in Laboratory Populations of the Southern Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)
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Abstract

Populations of the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus were subjected to 11 generations of natural and artificial selection for larval adaptation to, and female oviposition preference for, either or both of two species of hosts. Egg to adult survival did not change appreciably on either host in any of the populations. The number of eggs laid on, and the oviposition preference for, each of the hosts changed according to the selection regime, in the expected direction. Oviposition preference evolved both when females were exposed to a choice of two hosts, and when only one host was available. Genetic change occurred in the behavioral response to these hosts, but not in the physiological adaptedness of the larvae, suggesting that the diets of phytophagous insects could be evolutionarily more labile at the behavioral than at the physiological level.

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