Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Phylogenetic Inference From Restriction Endonuclease Cleavage Site Maps with Particular Reference to the Evolution of Humans and the Apes

Alan R. Templeton
Evolution
Vol. 37, No. 2 (Mar., 1983), pp. 221-244
DOI: 10.2307/2408332
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408332
Page Count: 24

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Phylogeny, Enzymes, Parsimony, Evolution, Humans, Topology, Phylogenetics, Datasets, Convergent evolution, Primates
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phylogenetic Inference From Restriction Endonuclease Cleavage Site Maps with Particular Reference to the Evolution of Humans and the Apes
Preview not available

Abstract

Estimation and testing procedures are presented for making phylogenetic inference from restriction endonuclease cleavage site data. The estimation procedure utilizes a compatibility analysis between enzyme data sets of the most parsimonious trees constructed from the restriction site patterns for a specific restriction enzyme. Next, a non-parametric test is given for comparing alternative phylogenies. This test utilizes a ranking procedure based upon the qualitative types of mutational events inferred to have occurred as well as the number of mutational events. Because of the test procedure, the algorithm can identify its areas of statistical strength and weakness. It is also shown that the areas of statistical strength occur under conditions where the estimation procedure tends to be statistically consistent and efficient and the assumption of parsimony not critical. A second non-parametric test is developed for testing the molecular clock hypothesis. To illustrate the power of these procedures, data derived from the mitochondrial DNA and globin DNA of man and the apes are analyzed. Although previous analyses of these data led to the speculation that ten times more information would be required to resolve the evolutionary relationships between man with chimps and gorillas, this algorithm resolved these relationships at the 5% level of significance. Moreover, the molecular clock hypothesis was rejected at the 1% level. It is argued that these conclusions are extremely robust in statistical and evolutionary senses. The implications of this phylogenetic inference when coupled with other types of data lead to the conclusion that knuckle-walking-not bipedalism-is the evolutionary novelty in mode of locomotion in the primates and that many other hominid features are primitive whereas their African ape counterparts are derived.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244