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The Evolutionary History of Drosophila buzzatii. VIII. Evidence for Endocyclic Selection Acting on the Inversion Polymorphism in a Natural Population

A. Ruiz, A. Fontdevila, M. Santos, M. Seoane and E. Torroja
Evolution
Vol. 40, No. 4 (Jul., 1986), pp. 740-755
DOI: 10.2307/2408459
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408459
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Evolutionary History of Drosophila buzzatii. VIII. Evidence for Endocyclic Selection Acting on the Inversion Polymorphism in a Natural Population
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Abstract

The pattern of selection acting in nature on the chromosomal polymorphism of the cactophilic species Drosophila buzzatii was investigated by comparing inversion and karyotypic frequencies through four different life-cycle stages: adult males, eggs, third-instar larvae, and immature adults. All population samples were obtained in June 1981 at an old Opuntia ficus-indica plantation near Carboneras, Spain. The analysis rests on several assumptions which are explicitly set forth and discussed. The results, if these assumptions prove true, indicate strong directional selection for larval viability acting on the second-chromosome karyotypes and also suggest selective differences in fecundity and longevity. Heterotic selection, however, cannot be ruled out for other fitness components such as male mating success. This kind of selection could be operating on the fourth-chromosome polymorphism as well. Some gene arrangements showed significant and opposite changes in frequency at different parts of the life cycle, thus demonstrating endocyclic selection.

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