Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Patterns of Multiple Paternity in Populations of Raphanus sativus

Norman C. Ellstrand and Diane L. Marshall
Evolution
Vol. 40, No. 4 (Jul., 1986), pp. 837-842
DOI: 10.2307/2408468
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408468
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns of Multiple Paternity in Populations of Raphanus sativus
Preview not available

Abstract

Although multiple paternity has been documented for a large number of species, detailed studies of variation in multiple paternity among broods, individuals, and populations are lacking. We measured the extent of multiple paternity in the multi-seeded fruits of wild radish, Raphanus sativus, from three natural populations in southern California. Every parent sampled produced one or more multiply sired fruits, and, in most plants, over half the fruits analyzed proved to be multiply sired. In all, 75% of the 388 multi-seeded fruits analyzed showed multiple paternity. Among these fruits, the minimum number of paternal donors ranged from one to four, with a mode of two paternal parents. The fraction of multiply sired fruits varied from 68-85% among populations and from 40-100% among plants. Plants were heterogeneous for multiple paternity in the 1984 population. A significant positive correlation between multiple paternity and number of fruits per plant suggests that plants preferentially abort single sired fruits. The total number of mates that could be detected for entire plants ranged from 3-14 with a mode of seven. Multiple paternity is likely to be important in other species producing multi-seeded fruits.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
837
    837
  • Thumbnail: Page 
838
    838
  • Thumbnail: Page 
839
    839
  • Thumbnail: Page 
840
    840
  • Thumbnail: Page 
841
    841
  • Thumbnail: Page 
842
    842