Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Evolution of Self-Fertilization and Inbreeding Depression in Plants. II. Empirical Observations

Douglas W. Schemske and Russell Lande
Evolution
Vol. 39, No. 1 (Jan., 1985), pp. 41-52
DOI: 10.2307/2408515
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408515
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Evolution of Self-Fertilization and Inbreeding Depression in Plants. II. Empirical Observations
Preview not available

Abstract

A bimodal distribution of outcrossing rates was observed for natural plant populations, with more primarily selfing and primarily outcrossing species, and fewer species with intermediate outcrossing rate than expected by chance. We suggest that this distribution results from selection for the maintenance of outcrossing in historically large, outcrossing populations with substantial inbreeding depression, and from selection for selfing when increased inbreeding, due to pollinator failure or population bottlenecks, reduces the level of inbreeding depression. Few species or populations are fixed at complete selfing or complete outcrossing. A low level of selfing in primarily outcrossing species is unlikely to be selectively advantageous, but will not reduce inbreeding depression to the level where selfing is selectively favored, particularly if accompanied by reproductive compensation. Similarly, occasional outcrossing in primarily selfing species is unlikely to regularly provide sufficient heterosis to maintain selection for outcrossing through individual selection. Genetic, morphological and ecological constraints may limit the potential for outcrossing rates in selfers to be reduced below some minimum level.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52