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Quantitative Genetics of Survival and Growth in Impatiens capensis

Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Evolution
Vol. 40, No. 1 (Jan., 1986), pp. 107-116
DOI: 10.2307/2408608
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408608
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Quantitative Genetics of Survival and Growth in Impatiens capensis
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Abstract

When variation in life-history characters is caused by many genes of small effect, then quantitative-genetic parameters may quantify constraints on rate and direction of microevolutionary change. I estimated heritabilities and genetic correlations for 16 life-history and morphological characters in two populations of Impatiens capensis, a partially self-pollinating herbaceous annual. The Madison population had little or no additive genetic variance for any of these characters, while the Milwaukee population had significant narrow-sense heritabilities and genetic correlations for several traits, including adult size, which is highly correlated with fitness. All genetic correlations among fitness components were positive, hence there is no evidence for antagonistic pleiotropy among these traits. Dissimilarity of heritabilities in the two populations supports theoretical predictions that long-term changes in genetic variance-covariance patterns may occur when population sizes are small and selection is strong, as may occur in many plant species.

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